Oakland Magazine announces new Nybll HQ Opening

Nybll’s new headquarters in West Oakland.

Nybll Opens a Commercial Kitchen in Oakland

The wellness-focused food-service company feeds MLB, NBA, NHL, and NFL teams.

By S. Rufus

The wellness-focused corporate food-service company Nybll just opened a new commercial kitchen in Oakland.

Founded in 2012 by chef Kristen Thibeault, Nybll aims to help professionals and athletes attain peak performance by delivering low-carb, high-protein, plant-forward dining experiencs at offices, clubhouses, and other spaces. 

Producing some 5,000 meals daily and — as reported in a press release — zero waste, Nybll sources ingredients locally whenever possible and prides itself on feeding MLB, NBA, and NHL teams, among others, along with providing underserved families with nutritious meals through its charitable Patra Project

The 12,000-square-foot kitchen opened on Sept. 17, introducing one hundred jobs to the local area, including a fleet of fifteen vans. It features cutting-edge appliances, vibrant colors, and art pieces curated by West Oakland artist, educator, and former skateboarder Keith “K-Dub” Williams.

At the Oakland facility, Nybll also collects excess food from corporations to be used in meal donations.

“Health is wealth. Clean proteins – especially sourced from plant-focused foods – are the key to achieving this wealth,” said Thibeault, a cancer survivor who reawakened her culinary interests with the meal concept she calls “Stealth Health.”

Incorporating macrobiotic, paleo, vegan, gluten-free, and Ayurvedic elements, typical Nybll menus include such dishes as Kimchi-tofu soup; herb-roasted potatoes with fennel; fattoush mixed green salad; rosemary lamb with mint; corn and butternut-squash risotto; grilled shrimp with mango relish; and za’atar with lemon and green beans.

“With this new Oakland location, Nybll can deliver meals at a higher capacity than ever before,” Thibeault said.

“At Nybll, we devlop peak-performance menus providing software programmers, championship baseball players, and underserved children the necessary fuel for a healthy life.”

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